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Posts Tagged ‘chrome’

Chrome 4.0 is out with extensions support

January 26th, 2010 1 comment

Well finally Google has released Chrome 4.0 and with it extensions support amongst the many other features which finally brings some much needed juice to the browser. I’ve been running Firefox and Chrome simultaneously (Chrome for gmail & google apps, firefox for daily browsing) but I have a feeling I may change to using Chrome full time now.

Some cool extensions to try (most are from Firefox)

  • Xmarks Bookmarks Sync – I’ve been using FoxXmarks to sync my bookmarks for a while now, so its only natural I install this for Chrome. You can also stick with the standard Bookmark sync via Google which you’ll need a Google account for.
  • Google Mail Checker / Google Alerter – there’s also the One Number extension that brings more than just checking gmail.
  • AdBlock – probably the number one reason most people wanted extensions in Chrome!
  • Forecastfox Weather – My weather extension I use in Firefox.
  • FlashBlock – Can’t stand videos playing automatically when you load a gazillion tabs and wonder WHO THE EFF is talking?
  • Goo.gl URL Shortner – none others required.
  • Firebug Lite – Not as feature packed as Firebug, but then why would they call it Lite?
  • IETab – Sometimes you gotta.

Chromed. There’s lots more if you’re into Facebook, Twitter and all the other fancy things these days, even one for uTorrent! Download the latest build and give things a go!

PS. You don’t need to restart Chrome to install extensions either!

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jQuery 1.4 released!

January 15th, 2010 No comments

What a way to start the weekend, jQuery 1.4 has been released! There’s so much ubber goodness in this release I nearly fell of my chair! I have yet to muse about but most definately worth a look, the performance boosts are insane!

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Google releases ChromeOS

November 20th, 2009 No comments

Google just released information and a presentation (below) about ChromeOS.

Wow, you can take a peek at the source as well. I’m not sure if its just a very tweaked minimalistic Linux Kernel with a Chrome Window Manager or what, but like they did with Chrome, this is definitely a Think Different product. Take a look at a visual tour of the ChromeOS.

I don’t think this will replace your traditional desktop completely (I still like to have my stuff with me rather than hosted somewhere!) but what happens to devices, peripherals etc, development environments (Imagine running Visual Studio over the intertubes on ADSL!) etc.

But one things for sure, it takes the idea of Operating Systems and how you view your operating system to a different level. All those tabs you see in Chrome now, are virtual desktop like instances in ChromeOS. More info can be got from the PCWorld article on ChromeOS.

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Wanna Be Startin’ Somethin’: Google announces Chrome OS

July 8th, 2009 1 comment

I’ve been soooo busy at work (impossible deadlines as always) that I’ve been a bit silent, but alas who could not be excited to hear about Google’s venture into the netbook market just to shake things up?

It’s been an exciting nine months since we launched the Google Chrome browser. Already, over 30 million people use it regularly. We designed Google Chrome for people who live on the web — searching for information, checking email, catching up on the news, shopping or just staying in touch with friends. However, the operating systems that browsers run on were designed in an era where there was no web. So today, we’re announcing a new project that’s a natural extension of Google Chrome — the Google Chrome Operating System. It’s our attempt to re-think what operating systems should be.

Google Chrome OS is an open source, lightweight operating system that will initially be targeted at netbooks. Later this year we will open-source its code, and netbooks running Google Chrome OS will be available for consumers in the second half of 2010. Because we’re already talking to partners about the project, and we’ll soon be working with the open source community, we wanted to share our vision now so everyone understands what we are trying to achieve.

Thats right, whilst many claimed the Google Chrome browser was infact an OS, now the company has come around with an actual OS with the Chrome moniker just to confuse the hell out of journo’s who just didn’t get the difference between a browser and an operating system.

Mind you, I do use Chrome quite a bit, especially not that I’ve switched full-time to GMail, its a great browser – just missing a few addons that Firefox has to really make it shine – like Adblock Plus, XMarks and web developer like extensions.

CNet has an interesting tidbit too. Whats important here is that it will be available for x86 and ARM processors and aims for a different breed of devices to their Android platform. Its based on a Linux Kernel with a new desktop environment (so another Gnome or KDE like desktop environment). As the Google Blog puts it:

Google Chrome OS is a new project, separate from Android. Android was designed from the beginning to work across a variety of devices from phones to set-top boxes to netbooks. Google Chrome OS is being created for people who spend most of their time on the web, and is being designed to power computers ranging from small netbooks to full-size desktop systems. While there are areas where Google Chrome OS and Android overlap, we believe choice will drive innovation for the benefit of everyone, including Google.

The idea was mocked by many several years ago, but I guess they had the last laugh now.

Confused about the direction Google is heading? You Are Not Alone, looks like Google‘s Wanna Be Startin’ Somethin’ telling Microsoft that We’ve Had Enough, that They Don’t Care About Us and to just Beat It. They are Here To Change The World which will no doubt turn into one heck of a Thriller coming up.

I figure most of you would be Speechless by now, some may even be Scared Of The Moon but fear not, they’re working Day and Night to make sure you get One More Chance to get On The Line as soon as your hardware will allow it! Google, you Rock My World. Does anyone even Remember The Time without Google now a days?

RIP Michael Jackson.

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Hot Pants: The Google Chrome Experiment to make you high

March 21st, 2009 2 comments

It seems the latest craze in the browser market (apart from Internet Explorer) is All About The Benjamins Javascript Engines. We have Google Chrome’s V8, Fruity Safari’s Nitro, WebKit have their own Squirrel Fish Extreme which will eventually power Safari 4, Firefox’s TraceMonkey and Opera’s Futhark. The past several months there have been numerous performance tests and  stats on pure Javascript performance across these platforms.

But now, Google has released The Chrome Experiment. Essentially a showcase of the ‘cooler’ things you can do with Javascript on the browser. Checkout the Browser Ball demo or the awesome Amiga Workbench Emulator (reminds me of Omar‘s old home page that emulated Windows 2000), the rest of the demos are equally impressive.

We think JavaScript is awesome. We also think browsers are awesome. Indeed, when we talk about them, we say they are the cat’s meow – which is an American expression meaning AWESOME.

In light of these deeply held beliefs, we created this site to showcase cool experiments for both JavaScript and web browsers.

These experiments were created by designers and programmers from around the world. Their work is making the web faster, more fun, and more open – the same spirit in which we built Google Chrome.

Awesomeness indeed.

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Google Chrome 2.0

January 9th, 2009 1 comment

While Microsoft flaunts Windows 7, everyone’s second favourite company, Google is hard at work on Chrome 2.0. They’ve just release a pre-beta release tagged Chrome 2.0.156.1 which brings some funky new changes:

  • New version of WebKit. WebKit is the open source code Google Chrome uses to render web pages (HTML and CSS). 1.0.154.36 used basically the same version of WebKit as Safari 3.1, but the WebKit team has made a lot of improvements since that was released. 156.1 uses WebKit version 528.8 or, more precisely, revision 39410 from the WebKit source tree. In addition to fixing bugs and enabling features like full-page zoom and autoscroll, the new version also enables some nifty CSS features:
  • Form Autocomplete. Google Chrome remembers what you’ve typed into fields on web pages. If you type in the same form again, it will show any previous values that match what you’ve typed so far. You can disable Form autocomplete on the Minor Tweaks tab of the Options dialog.  (Note: this is like the basic form autocomplete available in Firefox or Internet Explorer. It is not the same as the form fill feature in Google Toolbar.)
  • Full-page zoom. Previously, page zoom (Ctrl++ or Ctrl+-) increased or decreased only the text on a page. Zoom now scales everything on the page together, so pages look correct at different zoom levels.
  • Spell-checking improvements. You can now enable or disable spell checking in a text field by right-clicking in the field. You can also change the spell-checking language by right clicking. To enable spell-checking in a language, add it to the list of ‘languages you use to read web sites’ in the Fonts and Languages dialog ([Wrench] > Options > Minor Tweaks > Fonts and Languages). Note that Google Chrome doesn’t have spell-checking dictionaries for every language you can add to this list.
  • Autoscroll. Many users have asked for this and (thanks to our WebKit update), we now offer autoscrolling. Middle-click (click the mousewheel on most mice) on a page to turn on autoscroll, then move the mouse to scroll the page in any direction.
  • Docking dragged tabs. When you drag a tab to certain positions on the monitor, a docking icon will appear.  Release the mouse over the docking icon to have the tab snap to the docking position instead of being dropped at the same size as the original window. Docking positions are:
    • Monitor top: make the dropped tab maximized.
    • Monitor left/right: make the dropped tab full-height and half-width, aligned with the monitor edge.
    • Monitor bottom: make the dropped tab full-width and half-height, aligned with the bottom of the monitor.
    • Browser-window left/right: fit the browser window and the dropped tab side-by-side across the screen.
    • Browser-window bottom: fit the browser window and the dropped tab top-to-bottom across the screen.
  • Import bookmarks from Google Bookmarks. The [Wrench menu] > Import bookmarks & settings… option now has a Google Toolbar option to import Google Bookmarks. The bookmarks get imported into your Other bookmarks folder. The bookmarks are not kept in sync; the import process simply reads in the current set of online bookmarks.
  • New SafeBrowsing implementation. SafeBrowsing is now faster, more reliable, and uses the disk less often.
  • Use different browser profiles. You can start a new browser window that uses a different profile (different bookmarks, history, cookies, etc.). Use [Wrench menu] > New window in profile. When you create a new profile, you can name it and add a shortcut to your Desktop.
  • Update the V8 Javascript engine to version 0.4.6.0 (from 0.3.9.3).
  • New network code. Google Chrome now has its own implementation of the HTTP network protocol (we were using the WinHTTP library on Windows, but need common code for Mac and Linux). We fixed a few bugs in HTTP authentication and made Google Chrome more compatible with servers that reply with invalid HTTP responses. We need feedback on anything that’s currently broken, particularly with proxy servers, secure (https) sites, and sites that require log in.
  • New window frames on Windows XP and Vista, supporting windows cascading and tiling, and other window-management add-in programs.
  • Experimental user script support (similar to Greasemonkey). You can add a –enable-user-scripts flag to your Google Chrome shortcut to enable user scripts. See the developer documentation for details.
  • A new HTTPS-only browsing mode. Add –force-https to your Google Chrome shortcut, and it will only load HTTPS sites. Sites with SSL certificate errors will not load.

Go on, try it out.

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Google releases Chrome 1.0

December 12th, 2008 No comments

Epic news, Google has released a 1.0 release of Chrome.

We have removed the beta label as our goals for stability and performance have been met but our work is far from done. We are working to add some common browser features such as form autofill and RSS support in the near future. We are also developing an extensions platform along with support for Mac and Linux. If you are already using Google Chrome, the update system ensures that you get the latest bug fixes and security patches, so you will get the newest version automatically in the next few days.

You can download a windows version today, the Linux & Mac OS builds are still in development.

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Uninstalling Google Chrome

September 4th, 2008 No comments

So I’ve been high on Chrome the last day or so, but alas I had to uninstalled it.

Uninstalling Google Chrome

Nicely done Google.

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Google Chrome Released!

September 3rd, 2008 1 comment

As posted and you would have no doubt have heard, Google has entered the bra-ow-sar wars with their own take on how the web should be with Google Chrome. They just released the first beta for Windows XP / Vista today so go on and download a copy.

First impressions : WOW! Its ridiculously fast – taking Digg and PageFlakes as a benchmark – and the memory footprint is quite a lot better (23Mb) than the Firefox (68Mb – Safemode), Opera (41Mb) and Internet Explorer (52Mb) counterparts. As expected, each tab is a new child process to the main Chrome process, so closing a tab instantly releases the resources held by the child process.

Instructions on grabbing the sources – sucking it down the tubes as I write – is available on the Chromium website.

UPDATE: The Register has a humourous look at the Google Comic, good for a lunch-break read.

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Chrome, an Innovative browser from Google

September 2nd, 2008 No comments

I’ve just been reading up on the newly announced Google Chrome browser that will no doubt set a new standard for browsers. Its built on the WebKit engine and includes some really really different train of thoughts on how browsers should act and behave. You can read a very nicely done Comic Strip on the new things we can expect to see, which I think is genius in itself.

Google Chrome Browser

Some things that stood out from the usual norm:

  • Chrome seperates to a multi-process design system for tabs, this implies that a failure on one tab will not affect the entire browsing experience. This will initially increase the memory usage but over time it should mean leaner footprints thanks to cleaner recycling of resources. (Much like IE8)
  • They used WebKit as its leaner and faster than other rendering engines. (Which powers Safari of all things)
  • Has its own Javascript VM which is called V8 built from scratch that implements a faster IL for Javascript which provides a far better garbage collection mechanism than what is possible right now. But I wonder what that does for smaller ad-hoc style scripts that devs litter around?
  • New tabs will open with a similar style of initial page to Opera - SpeedDial – which they introduced in Opera 9.2, so this will pickout frequently visited sites and display them on a speed browse fashion.
  • Privacy mode similar to what IE8 offers in InPrivate ™ mode.
  • Popups are confined to their owner tab, this means we have _total_ control over the popups that annoy us.
  • Sandboxed tabs, which means any malware you may get are confined or ‘jailed’ not allowing any of your actions to be affected or monitored.
  • Plugins themselves are in a seperate process – taken out of the renderer itself – meaning that any flaws or stalls in the plugin wont affect the rest of the session.
  • Integration with the Malware API from Google. Which caught the MSY hack leak a few weeks back.

And finally, a slide about the open nature of Google Chrome, notice the little guy with a ball on the top left?

Whilst they are exciting features theres stuff here that have already been done by other companies (Opera and Microsoft) it’ll be interesting to see where Google goes with this. I dont think I’ve been more excited about a browser than today.

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