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Posts Tagged ‘firefox’

Chrome 4.0 is out with extensions support

January 26th, 2010 1 comment

Well finally Google has released Chrome 4.0 and with it extensions support amongst the many other features which finally brings some much needed juice to the browser. I’ve been running Firefox and Chrome simultaneously (Chrome for gmail & google apps, firefox for daily browsing) but I have a feeling I may change to using Chrome full time now.

Some cool extensions to try (most are from Firefox)

  • Xmarks Bookmarks Sync – I’ve been using FoxXmarks to sync my bookmarks for a while now, so its only natural I install this for Chrome. You can also stick with the standard Bookmark sync via Google which you’ll need a Google account for.
  • Google Mail Checker / Google Alerter – there’s also the One Number extension that brings more than just checking gmail.
  • AdBlock – probably the number one reason most people wanted extensions in Chrome!
  • Forecastfox Weather – My weather extension I use in Firefox.
  • FlashBlock – Can’t stand videos playing automatically when you load a gazillion tabs and wonder WHO THE EFF is talking?
  • Goo.gl URL Shortner – none others required.
  • Firebug Lite – Not as feature packed as Firebug, but then why would they call it Lite?
  • IETab – Sometimes you gotta.

Chromed. There’s lots more if you’re into Facebook, Twitter and all the other fancy things these days, even one for uTorrent! Download the latest build and give things a go!

PS. You don’t need to restart Chrome to install extensions either!

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jQuery 1.4 released!

January 15th, 2010 No comments

What a way to start the weekend, jQuery 1.4 has been released! There’s so much ubber goodness in this release I nearly fell of my chair! I have yet to muse about but most definately worth a look, the performance boosts are insane!

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Opera 10 finally released!

September 1st, 2009 No comments

Today marks the release of Opera 10.

Amongst the highlights:

- Revamped user interface
- Boosted speed from the new Opera Presto 2.2 engine, giving it a 40% increase from the previous version when running web applications (such as Gmail)
- Opera Mail has seen various improvements
- Opera Turbo, designed to increase browsing speed for those on slower Internet connections
- An inline spell checker, to help catch mistakes when typing in entry forms
- Thumbnail tabs which are resizable
- Speed Dial has been given personalization features

Download a copy or read up on the new features in this release, the site’s being hammered right now by the looks of it? I still remember starting out with Opera 5 back in 2001, a close friend designated Opera as his ‘porn browser’, purely because of the tabbing and speed (not to mention lightweightness ) of the browser.

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xkcd: Branding, browsing interwebs without Adblock Plus

August 17th, 2009 No comments

xkcd - Branding

So I guess you better download it now!

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Categories: General, Humour Tags: , , , , ,

Foxy ladies: Mozilla releases Firefox 3.5!

July 1st, 2009 No comments

The moment we’ve all been waiting for, Mozilla has released the final version of Firefox 3.5 (which was originally slated to be 3.1). Amongst the highlights include the new Gecko 1.9.1 rendering engine and (from their release notes):

  • Available in more than 70 languages. (Get your local version!)
  • Support for the HTML5 <video> and <audio> elements including native support for Ogg Theora encoded video and Vorbis encoded audio. (Try it here!)
  • Improved tools for controlling your private data, including a Private Browsing Mode.
  • Better web application performance using the new TraceMonkey JavaScript engine.
  • The ability to share your location with websites using Location Aware Browsing. (Try it here!)
  • Support for native JSON, and web worker threads.
  • Improvements to the Gecko layout engine, including speculative parsing for faster content rendering.
  • Support for new web technologies such as: downloadable fonts, CSS media queries, new transformations and properties, JavaScript query selectors, HTML5 local storage and offline application storage, <canvas> text, ICC profiles, and SVG transforms.

For the developers, the Mozilla developer centre details the changes in this release. But the most exciting is the support for <video> and <audio> elements from the HTML 5 draft and the inclusion of the TraceMonkey JavaScript engine.

Download it now!

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Hot Pants: The Google Chrome Experiment to make you high

March 21st, 2009 2 comments

It seems the latest craze in the browser market (apart from Internet Explorer) is All About The Benjamins Javascript Engines. We have Google Chrome’s V8, Fruity Safari’s Nitro, WebKit have their own Squirrel Fish Extreme which will eventually power Safari 4, Firefox’s TraceMonkey and Opera’s Futhark. The past several months there have been numerous performance tests and  stats on pure Javascript performance across these platforms.

But now, Google has released The Chrome Experiment. Essentially a showcase of the ‘cooler’ things you can do with Javascript on the browser. Checkout the Browser Ball demo or the awesome Amiga Workbench Emulator (reminds me of Omar‘s old home page that emulated Windows 2000), the rest of the demos are equally impressive.

We think JavaScript is awesome. We also think browsers are awesome. Indeed, when we talk about them, we say they are the cat’s meow – which is an American expression meaning AWESOME.

In light of these deeply held beliefs, we created this site to showcase cool experiments for both JavaScript and web browsers.

These experiments were created by designers and programmers from around the world. Their work is making the web faster, more fun, and more open – the same spirit in which we built Google Chrome.

Awesomeness indeed.

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Google Chrome 2.0

January 9th, 2009 1 comment

While Microsoft flaunts Windows 7, everyone’s second favourite company, Google is hard at work on Chrome 2.0. They’ve just release a pre-beta release tagged Chrome 2.0.156.1 which brings some funky new changes:

  • New version of WebKit. WebKit is the open source code Google Chrome uses to render web pages (HTML and CSS). 1.0.154.36 used basically the same version of WebKit as Safari 3.1, but the WebKit team has made a lot of improvements since that was released. 156.1 uses WebKit version 528.8 or, more precisely, revision 39410 from the WebKit source tree. In addition to fixing bugs and enabling features like full-page zoom and autoscroll, the new version also enables some nifty CSS features:
  • Form Autocomplete. Google Chrome remembers what you’ve typed into fields on web pages. If you type in the same form again, it will show any previous values that match what you’ve typed so far. You can disable Form autocomplete on the Minor Tweaks tab of the Options dialog.  (Note: this is like the basic form autocomplete available in Firefox or Internet Explorer. It is not the same as the form fill feature in Google Toolbar.)
  • Full-page zoom. Previously, page zoom (Ctrl++ or Ctrl+-) increased or decreased only the text on a page. Zoom now scales everything on the page together, so pages look correct at different zoom levels.
  • Spell-checking improvements. You can now enable or disable spell checking in a text field by right-clicking in the field. You can also change the spell-checking language by right clicking. To enable spell-checking in a language, add it to the list of ‘languages you use to read web sites’ in the Fonts and Languages dialog ([Wrench] > Options > Minor Tweaks > Fonts and Languages). Note that Google Chrome doesn’t have spell-checking dictionaries for every language you can add to this list.
  • Autoscroll. Many users have asked for this and (thanks to our WebKit update), we now offer autoscrolling. Middle-click (click the mousewheel on most mice) on a page to turn on autoscroll, then move the mouse to scroll the page in any direction.
  • Docking dragged tabs. When you drag a tab to certain positions on the monitor, a docking icon will appear.  Release the mouse over the docking icon to have the tab snap to the docking position instead of being dropped at the same size as the original window. Docking positions are:
    • Monitor top: make the dropped tab maximized.
    • Monitor left/right: make the dropped tab full-height and half-width, aligned with the monitor edge.
    • Monitor bottom: make the dropped tab full-width and half-height, aligned with the bottom of the monitor.
    • Browser-window left/right: fit the browser window and the dropped tab side-by-side across the screen.
    • Browser-window bottom: fit the browser window and the dropped tab top-to-bottom across the screen.
  • Import bookmarks from Google Bookmarks. The [Wrench menu] > Import bookmarks & settings… option now has a Google Toolbar option to import Google Bookmarks. The bookmarks get imported into your Other bookmarks folder. The bookmarks are not kept in sync; the import process simply reads in the current set of online bookmarks.
  • New SafeBrowsing implementation. SafeBrowsing is now faster, more reliable, and uses the disk less often.
  • Use different browser profiles. You can start a new browser window that uses a different profile (different bookmarks, history, cookies, etc.). Use [Wrench menu] > New window in profile. When you create a new profile, you can name it and add a shortcut to your Desktop.
  • Update the V8 Javascript engine to version 0.4.6.0 (from 0.3.9.3).
  • New network code. Google Chrome now has its own implementation of the HTTP network protocol (we were using the WinHTTP library on Windows, but need common code for Mac and Linux). We fixed a few bugs in HTTP authentication and made Google Chrome more compatible with servers that reply with invalid HTTP responses. We need feedback on anything that’s currently broken, particularly with proxy servers, secure (https) sites, and sites that require log in.
  • New window frames on Windows XP and Vista, supporting windows cascading and tiling, and other window-management add-in programs.
  • Experimental user script support (similar to Greasemonkey). You can add a –enable-user-scripts flag to your Google Chrome shortcut to enable user scripts. See the developer documentation for details.
  • A new HTTPS-only browsing mode. Add –force-https to your Google Chrome shortcut, and it will only load HTTPS sites. Sites with SSL certificate errors will not load.

Go on, try it out.

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Google releases Chrome 1.0

December 12th, 2008 No comments

Epic news, Google has released a 1.0 release of Chrome.

We have removed the beta label as our goals for stability and performance have been met but our work is far from done. We are working to add some common browser features such as form autofill and RSS support in the near future. We are also developing an extensions platform along with support for Mac and Linux. If you are already using Google Chrome, the update system ensures that you get the latest bug fixes and security patches, so you will get the newest version automatically in the next few days.

You can download a windows version today, the Linux & Mac OS builds are still in development.

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Chrome, an Innovative browser from Google

September 2nd, 2008 No comments

I’ve just been reading up on the newly announced Google Chrome browser that will no doubt set a new standard for browsers. Its built on the WebKit engine and includes some really really different train of thoughts on how browsers should act and behave. You can read a very nicely done Comic Strip on the new things we can expect to see, which I think is genius in itself.

Google Chrome Browser

Some things that stood out from the usual norm:

  • Chrome seperates to a multi-process design system for tabs, this implies that a failure on one tab will not affect the entire browsing experience. This will initially increase the memory usage but over time it should mean leaner footprints thanks to cleaner recycling of resources. (Much like IE8)
  • They used WebKit as its leaner and faster than other rendering engines. (Which powers Safari of all things)
  • Has its own Javascript VM which is called V8 built from scratch that implements a faster IL for Javascript which provides a far better garbage collection mechanism than what is possible right now. But I wonder what that does for smaller ad-hoc style scripts that devs litter around?
  • New tabs will open with a similar style of initial page to Opera - SpeedDial – which they introduced in Opera 9.2, so this will pickout frequently visited sites and display them on a speed browse fashion.
  • Privacy mode similar to what IE8 offers in InPrivate ™ mode.
  • Popups are confined to their owner tab, this means we have _total_ control over the popups that annoy us.
  • Sandboxed tabs, which means any malware you may get are confined or ‘jailed’ not allowing any of your actions to be affected or monitored.
  • Plugins themselves are in a seperate process – taken out of the renderer itself – meaning that any flaws or stalls in the plugin wont affect the rest of the session.
  • Integration with the Malware API from Google. Which caught the MSY hack leak a few weeks back.

And finally, a slide about the open nature of Google Chrome, notice the little guy with a ball on the top left?

Whilst they are exciting features theres stuff here that have already been done by other companies (Opera and Microsoft) it’ll be interesting to see where Google goes with this. I dont think I’ve been more excited about a browser than today.

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Determining Gender based on browsing history.

July 29th, 2008 No comments

An interesting bit-o-javascript posted by Mike-On-Ads that exploits an age old trick of leaking out the browsers navigated history. Armed with the info a cunning developer can workout what gender the viewer is.

The blog posting on the site explains the method used and allows you to try it out. Give it a ago and see how accurate it is :-)

Here are my results:

Likelihood of you being FEMALE is 34%
Likelihood of you being MALE is 66%

Site Male-Female Ratio
slashdot.org 1.74
theage.com.au 1.13

Damn, I knew I shouldnt be browsing SlashDot that much, atleast it wasnt Cosmopolitan or Womens Weekly (ooops!). Unfortunately, only my current session records the history as I clear my page history when firefox closes. I’ll have to try it again and see if it changes.

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