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Posts Tagged ‘mozilla’

Thunderbird 3.0 Beta 4 fixes corrupted summary files!

October 6th, 2009 No comments

Since ditching Outlook after Outlook 2003 (Outlook 2007, 2003 was fine in comparison) came around I’ve been using Mozilla Thunderbird as my ever faithful email client. Its fast, lightweight and not as bloated as Outlook is – couple it with Lightning and you’ll be laughing!

Thunderbird 3 brings some cool features for users with the biggest being tabbed message windows (and calendars etc). If you downloaded the new 3.x betas make sure you get Beta 4, the long standing issue with the Messagebox Summary file being corrupt has been finally addressed. Its been a pet hate for a long time now, sometimes searching a folder can corrupt an MSF (means having to go and remove the MSF so it rebuilds the index!), no more! Thunderbird will now fixup any problematic MSF files in the background, yay!

The search in Thunderbird 3 is a massive improvement over the other clients I’ve used, give it a go!

After you download Thunderbird, make sure you get the latest nightly for Lightning Calendar Addon and Google Provider and use them.

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Opera 10 finally released!

September 1st, 2009 No comments

Today marks the release of Opera 10.

Amongst the highlights:

- Revamped user interface
- Boosted speed from the new Opera Presto 2.2 engine, giving it a 40% increase from the previous version when running web applications (such as Gmail)
- Opera Mail has seen various improvements
- Opera Turbo, designed to increase browsing speed for those on slower Internet connections
- An inline spell checker, to help catch mistakes when typing in entry forms
- Thumbnail tabs which are resizable
- Speed Dial has been given personalization features

Download a copy or read up on the new features in this release, the site’s being hammered right now by the looks of it? I still remember starting out with Opera 5 back in 2001, a close friend designated Opera as his ‘porn browser’, purely because of the tabbing and speed (not to mention lightweightness ) of the browser.

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Foxy ladies: Mozilla releases Firefox 3.5!

July 1st, 2009 No comments

The moment we’ve all been waiting for, Mozilla has released the final version of Firefox 3.5 (which was originally slated to be 3.1). Amongst the highlights include the new Gecko 1.9.1 rendering engine and (from their release notes):

  • Available in more than 70 languages. (Get your local version!)
  • Support for the HTML5 <video> and <audio> elements including native support for Ogg Theora encoded video and Vorbis encoded audio. (Try it here!)
  • Improved tools for controlling your private data, including a Private Browsing Mode.
  • Better web application performance using the new TraceMonkey JavaScript engine.
  • The ability to share your location with websites using Location Aware Browsing. (Try it here!)
  • Support for native JSON, and web worker threads.
  • Improvements to the Gecko layout engine, including speculative parsing for faster content rendering.
  • Support for new web technologies such as: downloadable fonts, CSS media queries, new transformations and properties, JavaScript query selectors, HTML5 local storage and offline application storage, <canvas> text, ICC profiles, and SVG transforms.

For the developers, the Mozilla developer centre details the changes in this release. But the most exciting is the support for <video> and <audio> elements from the HTML 5 draft and the inclusion of the TraceMonkey JavaScript engine.

Download it now!

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HOWTO: Importing Thunderbird contacts into GMail

May 25th, 2009 No comments

I’ve moved my entire mailbox over to Gmail now, previously I was a firm believer in IMAP and didnt move to Gmail fully sooner because of the lack of folders – unlike in real life where my life is usually a mess, I keep my mail quite organised. Whats more, the junk mail filters are second to none.

Whilst the mail trickled down via POP3 (thank god for IMAP!) I had to manually get the contacts to be updated in gmail. Here’s how to get your contacts into GMail from thunderbird – and possibly other clients.

  • Open your addressbook in Thunderbird.  Tools > Addressbook or {CTRL+2}
  • Goto Tools > Export menu item
  • We need a CSV file, change the default file type from LDF to ‘Comma Seperated’ and save it with an appropriate filename.
  • Once exported, open up the CSV file in OpenOffice or Microsoft Excel.
  • Heres where we get trippy. By default, when you export you will get these headers:
    • First Name
    • Last Name
    • Display Name
    • Nickname
    • Primary Email
  • We need to make sure that we have the four main columns that GMail looks for:
    • First Name
    • Last Name
    • Display Name
    • Email Address
  • Remove all the other columns (so Nickname, Secondary Email etc etc)
  • Save the file as something else so we can go back to it later if required.
  • Goto GMail, click Contacts and click ‘Import’ from the right panel header.
  • Point to the CSV file you  just saved and let it import, you will find that the Display names are automajically resolved, duplicates trimmed and others merged.

Enjoy.

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Google Chrome 2.0

January 9th, 2009 1 comment

While Microsoft flaunts Windows 7, everyone’s second favourite company, Google is hard at work on Chrome 2.0. They’ve just release a pre-beta release tagged Chrome 2.0.156.1 which brings some funky new changes:

  • New version of WebKit. WebKit is the open source code Google Chrome uses to render web pages (HTML and CSS). 1.0.154.36 used basically the same version of WebKit as Safari 3.1, but the WebKit team has made a lot of improvements since that was released. 156.1 uses WebKit version 528.8 or, more precisely, revision 39410 from the WebKit source tree. In addition to fixing bugs and enabling features like full-page zoom and autoscroll, the new version also enables some nifty CSS features:
  • Form Autocomplete. Google Chrome remembers what you’ve typed into fields on web pages. If you type in the same form again, it will show any previous values that match what you’ve typed so far. You can disable Form autocomplete on the Minor Tweaks tab of the Options dialog.  (Note: this is like the basic form autocomplete available in Firefox or Internet Explorer. It is not the same as the form fill feature in Google Toolbar.)
  • Full-page zoom. Previously, page zoom (Ctrl++ or Ctrl+-) increased or decreased only the text on a page. Zoom now scales everything on the page together, so pages look correct at different zoom levels.
  • Spell-checking improvements. You can now enable or disable spell checking in a text field by right-clicking in the field. You can also change the spell-checking language by right clicking. To enable spell-checking in a language, add it to the list of ‘languages you use to read web sites’ in the Fonts and Languages dialog ([Wrench] > Options > Minor Tweaks > Fonts and Languages). Note that Google Chrome doesn’t have spell-checking dictionaries for every language you can add to this list.
  • Autoscroll. Many users have asked for this and (thanks to our WebKit update), we now offer autoscrolling. Middle-click (click the mousewheel on most mice) on a page to turn on autoscroll, then move the mouse to scroll the page in any direction.
  • Docking dragged tabs. When you drag a tab to certain positions on the monitor, a docking icon will appear.  Release the mouse over the docking icon to have the tab snap to the docking position instead of being dropped at the same size as the original window. Docking positions are:
    • Monitor top: make the dropped tab maximized.
    • Monitor left/right: make the dropped tab full-height and half-width, aligned with the monitor edge.
    • Monitor bottom: make the dropped tab full-width and half-height, aligned with the bottom of the monitor.
    • Browser-window left/right: fit the browser window and the dropped tab side-by-side across the screen.
    • Browser-window bottom: fit the browser window and the dropped tab top-to-bottom across the screen.
  • Import bookmarks from Google Bookmarks. The [Wrench menu] > Import bookmarks & settings… option now has a Google Toolbar option to import Google Bookmarks. The bookmarks get imported into your Other bookmarks folder. The bookmarks are not kept in sync; the import process simply reads in the current set of online bookmarks.
  • New SafeBrowsing implementation. SafeBrowsing is now faster, more reliable, and uses the disk less often.
  • Use different browser profiles. You can start a new browser window that uses a different profile (different bookmarks, history, cookies, etc.). Use [Wrench menu] > New window in profile. When you create a new profile, you can name it and add a shortcut to your Desktop.
  • Update the V8 Javascript engine to version 0.4.6.0 (from 0.3.9.3).
  • New network code. Google Chrome now has its own implementation of the HTTP network protocol (we were using the WinHTTP library on Windows, but need common code for Mac and Linux). We fixed a few bugs in HTTP authentication and made Google Chrome more compatible with servers that reply with invalid HTTP responses. We need feedback on anything that’s currently broken, particularly with proxy servers, secure (https) sites, and sites that require log in.
  • New window frames on Windows XP and Vista, supporting windows cascading and tiling, and other window-management add-in programs.
  • Experimental user script support (similar to Greasemonkey). You can add a –enable-user-scripts flag to your Google Chrome shortcut to enable user scripts. See the developer documentation for details.
  • A new HTTPS-only browsing mode. Add –force-https to your Google Chrome shortcut, and it will only load HTTPS sites. Sites with SSL certificate errors will not load.

Go on, try it out.

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Google releases Chrome 1.0

December 12th, 2008 No comments

Epic news, Google has released a 1.0 release of Chrome.

We have removed the beta label as our goals for stability and performance have been met but our work is far from done. We are working to add some common browser features such as form autofill and RSS support in the near future. We are also developing an extensions platform along with support for Mac and Linux. If you are already using Google Chrome, the update system ensures that you get the latest bug fixes and security patches, so you will get the newest version automatically in the next few days.

You can download a windows version today, the Linux & Mac OS builds are still in development.

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Google Chrome Released!

September 3rd, 2008 1 comment

As posted and you would have no doubt have heard, Google has entered the bra-ow-sar wars with their own take on how the web should be with Google Chrome. They just released the first beta for Windows XP / Vista today so go on and download a copy.

First impressions : WOW! Its ridiculously fast – taking Digg and PageFlakes as a benchmark – and the memory footprint is quite a lot better (23Mb) than the Firefox (68Mb – Safemode), Opera (41Mb) and Internet Explorer (52Mb) counterparts. As expected, each tab is a new child process to the main Chrome process, so closing a tab instantly releases the resources held by the child process.

Instructions on grabbing the sources – sucking it down the tubes as I write – is available on the Chromium website.

UPDATE: The Register has a humourous look at the Google Comic, good for a lunch-break read.

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