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Posts Tagged ‘operating system’

Google releases ChromeOS

November 20th, 2009 No comments

Google just released information and a presentation (below) about ChromeOS.

Wow, you can take a peek at the source as well. I’m not sure if its just a very tweaked minimalistic Linux Kernel with a Chrome Window Manager or what, but like they did with Chrome, this is definitely a Think Different product. Take a look at a visual tour of the ChromeOS.

I don’t think this will replace your traditional desktop completely (I still like to have my stuff with me rather than hosted somewhere!) but what happens to devices, peripherals etc, development environments (Imagine running Visual Studio over the intertubes on ADSL!) etc.

But one things for sure, it takes the idea of Operating Systems and how you view your operating system to a different level. All those tabs you see in Chrome now, are virtual desktop like instances in ChromeOS. More info can be got from the PCWorld article on ChromeOS.

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Wanna Be Startin’ Somethin’: Google announces Chrome OS

July 8th, 2009 1 comment

I’ve been soooo busy at work (impossible deadlines as always) that I’ve been a bit silent, but alas who could not be excited to hear about Google’s venture into the netbook market just to shake things up?

It’s been an exciting nine months since we launched the Google Chrome browser. Already, over 30 million people use it regularly. We designed Google Chrome for people who live on the web — searching for information, checking email, catching up on the news, shopping or just staying in touch with friends. However, the operating systems that browsers run on were designed in an era where there was no web. So today, we’re announcing a new project that’s a natural extension of Google Chrome — the Google Chrome Operating System. It’s our attempt to re-think what operating systems should be.

Google Chrome OS is an open source, lightweight operating system that will initially be targeted at netbooks. Later this year we will open-source its code, and netbooks running Google Chrome OS will be available for consumers in the second half of 2010. Because we’re already talking to partners about the project, and we’ll soon be working with the open source community, we wanted to share our vision now so everyone understands what we are trying to achieve.

Thats right, whilst many claimed the Google Chrome browser was infact an OS, now the company has come around with an actual OS with the Chrome moniker just to confuse the hell out of journo’s who just didn’t get the difference between a browser and an operating system.

Mind you, I do use Chrome quite a bit, especially not that I’ve switched full-time to GMail, its a great browser – just missing a few addons that Firefox has to really make it shine – like Adblock Plus, XMarks and web developer like extensions.

CNet has an interesting tidbit too. Whats important here is that it will be available for x86 and ARM processors and aims for a different breed of devices to their Android platform. Its based on a Linux Kernel with a new desktop environment (so another Gnome or KDE like desktop environment). As the Google Blog puts it:

Google Chrome OS is a new project, separate from Android. Android was designed from the beginning to work across a variety of devices from phones to set-top boxes to netbooks. Google Chrome OS is being created for people who spend most of their time on the web, and is being designed to power computers ranging from small netbooks to full-size desktop systems. While there are areas where Google Chrome OS and Android overlap, we believe choice will drive innovation for the benefit of everyone, including Google.

The idea was mocked by many several years ago, but I guess they had the last laugh now.

Confused about the direction Google is heading? You Are Not Alone, looks like Google‘s Wanna Be Startin’ Somethin’ telling Microsoft that We’ve Had Enough, that They Don’t Care About Us and to just Beat It. They are Here To Change The World which will no doubt turn into one heck of a Thriller coming up.

I figure most of you would be Speechless by now, some may even be Scared Of The Moon but fear not, they’re working Day and Night to make sure you get One More Chance to get On The Line as soon as your hardware will allow it! Google, you Rock My World. Does anyone even Remember The Time without Google now a days?

RIP Michael Jackson.

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The anatomy of the Ext4 File-System

February 23rd, 2009 No comments

Tim Jones has posted an article on the IBM DeveloperWorks website about the importance and anatomy of the Ext4 file system for Linux.

The first supported file system for Linux was the Minix file system. This file system had some significant performance issues, so another file system was created specifically for Linux called the extended file system. The first extended file system (ext1) was designed by Remy Card and introduced into Linux in April 1992. The ext1 file system was the first to use the virtual file system (VFS) switch implemented in the 0.96c kernel and supported file systems up to 2 gigabytes (GB) in size.

The second extended file system (ext2), also implemented by Remy Card, was introduced in January 1993. It adopted advanced ideas from other file systems of the day (such as the Berkeley Fast File System [FFS]). Ext2 extended supported file systems of 2TB in size, although 2.6 kernels extended the maximum size of ext2 file systems to 32TB.

The third extended file system (ext3) was a major advance in Linux file systems, even though its performance was less than some of its competitors. The ext3 file system introduced the concept of journaling to improve the reliability of the file system when the system is abruptly halted. And although competing file systems had better performance (such as Silicon Graphics’ XFS and the IBM® Journaled File System [JFS]), ext3 supported in-place upgrades from systems already using ext2. Ext3 was introduced in November 2001 and implemented by Stephen Tweedie.

Fast-forward to today. We now have the fourth extended file system (ext4). Ext4 introduces numerous new advancements for performance, scalability, and reliability. Most notably, ext4 supports file systems of 1 exabyte in size. Ext4 was implemented by a team of developers, led by Theodore Tso (the ext3 maintainer), and was introduced in the 2.6.19 kernel. It is now stable in the 2.6.28 kernel (as of December 2008).

Ext4 borrows many useful concepts from a variety of competing file systems. For example, the extent approach to block management had been implemented in JFS. Another block management-related feature (delayed allocation) was implemented in both XFS and in Sun Microsystems’ ZFS.

Well worth a read as it covers some of the significant changes and updates made to Ext4 and how it differs from previous releases. I’m using XFS on my file server eagerly awating the arrival of Btrfs.

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Pre-Christmas Cheer, Paul Thurrott previews Windows 7 Beta 1

December 27th, 2008 1 comment

Almost missed this one, Paul Thurrott of WinSuperSite fame has previewed Windows 7 Beta 1 a day before Christmas – he must have been an ultra good  boy in that case.

Well, the waiting is finally over. What you’re looking at here is the eagerly awaited Windows 7 Beta, the pre-release version of Microsoft’s next operating system that will ship publicly by mid-January. As promised, there are no new features exposed in the Beta: Instead, Microsoft has tweaked all of the existed features that were announced at PDC 2008 and provided a build that is capable of day-to-day use. I’ll be reviewing the Windows 7 Beta soon.

Whilst most will have to wait a tinsy bit more before they get their hands on the ‘official’ Beta 1 release – tagged v6.1.7000.0 (winmain.win7beta.081212-1400).

Paul gives us a run down of the installation (part1, part2), first boot (part1 – with Windows Media Player, IE amongst the shots, part2 – Control panel applets, wireless, desktop UI changes).

Windows 7 Beta 1

If that wasnt enough, NeoWin also has a thread from a forum member of the leaked pre-release. Wow, is this not the best Christmas EVAR for l33tle geeks around the globe?

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OpenSolaris 2008.11 out the door!!!

December 3rd, 2008 No comments

OpenSolaris 2008.11 has just been released, it encompasses some super cool new features and I’ve been waiting patiently to try this OS – need something new to learn!

The OpenSolaris 2008.11 operating system is a point of integration for the installation, desktop, and package management system projects on OpenSolaris.org. Today, the OpenSolaris 2008.11 live CD is available with the following feature updates:

ZFS Time Slider and Songbird;suspend/resume and CPU power management; Distribution Constructor and Prototype Automated Installer; WebStack with 64-bit MySQL, CherryPy, and DTrace for Ruby; GNOME 2.24, OpenOffice.org 3.0, and Firefox 3; Many F/OSS applications added, including top, sudo and Emacs; 700 additional man pages and Package Manager online help

Just a bit of background, OpenSolaris is based on Solaris, which was originally released by Sun Micro-Systems in 1991. Sun decided to release Open-Solaris to build a developer community around their Solaris product. Eventually it seems they will be basing technology for Solaris from OpenSolaris. So you know OpenSolaris will rock your world if its backed by Sun.

Download page for OpenSolaris 2008.11 or Direct Download of ISO and the 2008.11 Release notes.

Checkout the newly revamped OpenSolaris website, in particular the Learn area. Personally I’m looking forward to seeing the ZFS, Virtualisation Enhancements and DTrace loving.

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Windows 25 Years old

November 22nd, 2008 No comments

Completely forgot about a birthday, Windows turned 25 on the 10th of November.

On November 10th, 1983, Bill Gates first unveilled Microsoft Windows (v1.0) to the world at an unprecedented elaborate event at the Helmsley Palace Hotel (Wikipedia) in New York City. Windows 1.0 boasted a graphical user-interface to the MS-DOs world with menus, icons and multi-tasking. Not that I was around back then (I was born just under a year later) but here’s some screenies for your pleasure.

Windows 1.0 Boxshot

Windows 1.0 Boxshot

All for a cheap $99 and it even comes with Reversi. Steve Balmer, crazy back then, still a crazy guy today.

Belated Happy Birthday.

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Ubuntu 8.10: Intrepid Ibex Released!

October 31st, 2008 1 comment

With the amount of coverage surely to be taken by Windows 7 we can’t forget the other side of the force, Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex was released a few hours ago.

Believe it or not I actually stayed up waiting for it to hit the servers, then hopped over to the iinet FTP server (mirror’d by the Internode servers also) as the 3FL Mirror (Westnet) wasn’t up to date (it is now!) and started leeching the sucker.

8.10 brings:

  • Linux Kernel v2.6.27 – which has the new Atheros driver, improved webcam support and support for the UBFIS file system, among other things documented on KernelNewbies.
  • Support for the UBIFS file system – especially for SSD/Flash drives in the hope it will improve performance and longetitivity of such devices.
  • GNOME v2.24 – which brings a slew of improvements including a tabbed nautilus.
  • X.Org v7.4 – includes Xorg-Server 1.5 which brings faster startup/shutdown times, hot-plugging for input devices.
  • Network Manager 0.7 – which adds 3G and PPPoE connectivity
  • Dynamic Kernel Module support – recompiles kernel modules automajically when kernel is updated.
  • LOTS more, documented in the 8.10 Release notes.

Mono 2.0, Python 2.6 and OpenOffice 3.0 didnt make the cut but will be present in 9.04 already dubbed the Jaunty Jackalope.

Download Ubuntu 8.10 and give it ago. For a complete look at Ubuntu 8.10, checkout these reviews:

Whilst I’ve had to hurry off to work with barely a few hours of sleep I did catch a few minutes of usage after a speedy install thanks to the USB installation method.

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Windows Se7en: So it begins…

October 29th, 2008 No comments

Unless you’ve been living under a rock under the Apple tree you would have heard that a little company in Redmond WA has been working on a new version of Windows dubbed Windows 7 (which is what it will actually be called for once!).

At PDC today, Microsoft finally unveiled the much-anticipated release of Windows 7 and handed out pre-beta bits to atendees (tagged 6801.winmain_win7m3.081020-1655). They demonstrated a newer build which was tagged 6933.winmain.081020-184 during PDC which unfortunately was not given out. Unfortunately I couldn’t go due to work constraints, but in case your in the same boat I’ve collected some of the best sources of info out there for you to browse through.

First and foremost, some pretty pictures of the glassy new desktop UI.

Some interesting articles out of the many out there that are recommended reading:

For the pretty screenshots, see galleries here and here. More information and probably a bit more discussion will follow soon.

EDIT:
ArsTechnica have got an updated build reviewed which goes into bit more depth too and NeoWin has posted a nice gallery walkthrough of the Win7 UI and details about Vista SP2.

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